What Is a Social Media Influencer?

The buzz word of the past few years has been influencers and because of its buzzword status it has taken on a meaning so bland, it is almost useless. An influencer is literally any person with influence. That can be a celebrity or the owner of a local business who influences what people wear in a small town. However, a social media influencer is a specific type of individual who has influence across social media spheres. They are also a key part of growing your  business’s online presence and more importantly your social media following.

A social media influencer is one who exerts influence over an audience of any size on any variety of social media platforms.

However, as I argue in my forthcoming book “You Don’t Need Social Media Unless You are Doing It Right: A Small Business Guide to Social Media” that type of influencer isn’t necessarily relevant:

The most effective influencers are not the people at the bottom with one follower, nor are they the people at the very top with all the followers. They are the people who have moderately sized followings and who have audiences in more than one circle.

Think about it this way:

  • The person at the apex of an influencer pyramid (i.e. the “most important name” or the person with the biggest following on a topic) has a lot of authority but they only talk about one thing like sneakers.

  • The person at the bottom of the influencer pyramid might talk about a lot of things or about a singular thing but they likely have too few followers for it to be worth your time to engage with them.

  • The real influencers who provide brand value are those in between the bottom and the top who have influencer in multiple segments i.e. sneakers and ice cream and have a moderate to decent number of followers. These are connectors.

In his book The Tipping Point, Malcolm Gladwell defines connectors as, “a handful of people with a truly extraordinary knack for making friends and acquaintances.” Steven Johnson, in his book Where Good Ideas Come From, discusses this social construct even further. He argues that it is not just that connectors are sharing information across different groups – it is that they are sharing information that comes from a different context.

This difference is context i.e. someone who is not just an ice cream enthusiast but also a lover of crime dramas  and 18th Century Chinese art helps an idea to permeate new information networks that create idea spread. Not only do ideas spread that way but that as ideas or concepts cross groups, they begin to innovate and change other people’s ideas.

People’s ideas change because they are being hit with information that is new and novel to them. This is the real way that you change broad scale perception and why you begin an influencer approach.

You need your topic to spread into new audiences where it would not otherwise spread because you only have access to your limited audience. When you identify connector-influencers (who from here out we will simply call influencers) you are able to scale your ideas out to audiences where these ideas, in part because they are new, can make a broader impact.

The growth of an idea then comes not from the size of the audience following a specific person but rather their ability to transmit ideas across multiple channels. These people are more effective than other types of influencers because they possess the ability to cross-pollinate.

A real social media influencer is someone who helps a message spread through crosspolinating it across different channels. As you begin to source influencers, you should be looking for not just those at the apex of their relevance but for those who are connector-influencers and can help your idea spread outside of your segmented audience.

There is a fascinating TED talk by Dave Troy who maps social media maps with geographic maps and shows the ghetto-ization of ideas within social communities. Therein, we see the role of the connector-influencer brought to life as they are someone who quite literally traverses social divides. That is the social media influencer who matters. That is the one you want to create partnerships with as you grow your channels and think about new and different means of growing a social media following.

So, I ask you: how are you developing your influencer plan? What are you doing to ensure that you are finding connector – influencers? I will discuss this more in the next post.

Cross-Pollination:How to Identify Partnership Targets – The Listicle

In last week’s blog post on Cross-pollination, I discussed the idea that you should think about social media beyond your platforms- social media is about the broad community and partnerships can  be a simple way to grow big community quickly. It’s the most underutilized tool to grow your social media channels and your in real life channels. In today’s post, the following listicle tells you how to grow your social media following through partnerships.

  1. Do some preliminary research on your community and ask them what brands they have an affinity with.  This can be accomplished via free easy tools like a poll on your Facebook page, a SurveyMonkey survey or via slightly costlier social media data tools like Networked Insights, or Sysmos.
  2. Once you’ve identified a few brands that overlap – take a look at what you have to offer that company. If you are a large company, money can be a fast and easy motivator towards partnership. If you are smaller, think about what you can provide them. It could be things as simple as a new audience, the introduction to a devoted fan base, your skills as a social marketer or a number of other skills. In short, you are determining what skills and resources you can bring to another business.
  3. Once you’ve established your value proposition (i.e. the good things you can bring to another brand), you will want to reach out. The best way to reach out is if you have a warm contact at that other company especially someone who is already in social and shares your philosophy. Warning: This is difficult (referring to paragraph 1) as most people still think about social media and think only about their platforms. Rather than create community, they are focused on creating more original content about themselves.
  4. Hold a discussion with your new internal contact about how cross-promoting on each other’s social media channels may help to bolster your community, increase the wealth of interesting content and yes, drive sales.
  5. There are a lot of ways to create social media partnerships and they can be as simple as cross-promoting content to as complicated as co-creation, co-advertising or the co-production of a new product. So scale up or down according to the warmth of the relationship, the interest in community development and your experience. It’s often simplest to start small out of the gate and grow your integration after you’ve had a few small wins under your belt.
  6. Set up early what you think a “win” would be i.e. what type of metrics would you be looking for from this relationship and how do you get there. This will help to firmly establish the relationship and to ensure that everyone is agreeing to and looking towards the same end goal. The simplest way to derail your business partnership (in social, or frankly anywhere) is to not have clear established goals that you are both working towards.
  7. Create. Enact. Measure.
  8. Repeat with other new and interesting brands.

 

To make sure you’ve got it, use the below checklist in the process of creating a social media partnership:

  • Research your audience: what are brands they care about.
  • Determine what you have to offer in a partnership deal
  • Develop the warm relationship with a new brand
  • Discuss ideas and concepts for development
  • Set early metrics for success and ensure alignment
  • Create. Enact. Measure.